Govt said to have ignored warnings over GST roll out

Mumbai: The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

Weeks before the 1 July start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the people in the know said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

“At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.'” said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The people familiar with the matter said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on 1 July.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.

In one of the latest changes, the GST council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5% from 12%, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.” Reuters

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.”

See Also : economictimes.indiatimes.com

The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (

Weeks before the July 1 start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.'” said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The sources said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on July 1.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a

In one of the latest changes, the GST Council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5 percent from 12 percent, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.”

See Also : www.nasdaq.com

MUMBAI, Dec 15 (Reuters) – The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

Weeks before the July 1 start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

“At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.'” said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The sources said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on July 1.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.

In one of the latest changes, the GST Council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5 percent from 12 percent, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.”

See Also : india.timesofnews.com

MUMBAI (Reuters) – The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

Weeks before the July 1 start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

“At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.'” said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The sources said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on July 1.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.

In one of the latest changes, the GST Council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5 percent from 12 percent, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.”

See Also : www.business-standard.com

The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

Weeks before the July 1 start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

“At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.'” said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The sources said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on July 1.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.

In one of the latest changes, the GST Council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5 percent from 12 percent, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.”

See Also : www.sify.com

MUMBAI: The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

Weeks before the July 1 start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

“At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.'” said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The sources said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on July 1.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.

In one of the latest changes, the GST Council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5 percent from 12 percent, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.”

See Also : smartinvestor.business-standard.com

The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

Weeks before the July 1 start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

“At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.'” said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The sources said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on July 1.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.

In one of the latest changes, the GST Council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5 percent from 12 percent, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.”

See Also : www.shareinvestor.com

[MUMBAI] The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.Weeks before the July 1 start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.”It’s not a complicated process,” finance minister Arun Jaitley said on June 20.However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.”At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not,'”said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.”Now people are laughingly asking, ‘so who was really not ready?'” he said.The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.Warnings The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.The sources said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on July 1.”Obviously, it led to chaos,” he said.The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Mr Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Mr Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.In one of the latest changes, the GST Council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to five per cent from 12 per cent, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections”. A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.”GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.”You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.” However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.” A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation”in building the network.”No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.” REUTERS

See Also : www.sify.com

MUMBAI (Reuters) – The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

Weeks before the July 1 start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

“At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.'” said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The sources said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on July 1.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.

In one of the latest changes, the GST Council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5 percent from 12 percent, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.”

(Additional reporting by Manoj Kumar in NEW DELHI: Writing by Rahul Bhatia: Editing by Neil Fullick.)

MUMBAI, Dec 15 (Reuters) – The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

Weeks before the July 1 start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the sources said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

“At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.”‘ said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The sources said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on July 1.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.

In one of the latest changes, the GST Council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5 percent from 12 percent, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.” (Additional reporting by Manoj Kumar in NEW DELHI: Writing by Rahul Bhatia: Editing by Neil Fullick.)

Mumbai: The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

The Indian government ignored several warnings from private companies that the complex technology required for a nationwide goods and services tax (GST) to work smoothly was not ready for launch, several people who worked on the project said.

Weeks before the 1 July start of India’s biggest tax overhaul in decades, the government declared itself ready and chided industry experts who said more time was needed to prepare for the changes.

However, more than 10 tax and IT consultants who worked on the project said that behind the scenes the government was ignoring warnings for more testing of the complex system even as it was pushing through late changes.

While the people in the know said Infosys, which built the GST technological network, made “basic errors”, they said government officials have not accepted any responsibility for the glitches in the GST roll out.

The government is still making changes to tax rates, filing deadlines, and other features, making it difficult to stabilise the system, they said, declining to be identified for fear of losing future government contracts.

“At that time, the powers in New Delhi were mocking industry, saying ‘the government’s ready, but industry’s not.'” said the director of a financial planning firm involved in developing the GST network.

The finance ministry and GSTN, the government authority managing the GST network, declined to comment on specific problems about the GST rollout or specific warnings by industry that more time was needed for testing.

The GST law was debated for decades, industry had enough time to prepare, and glitches are being fixed, a finance ministry spokesman said.

Infosys said in a statement that “several stakeholder concerns” had been raised about the GST system and some of its best engineers were working to resolve all issues.

The GST system was designed to replace a slew of federal and state levies, and Moody’s Investors Service has said the tax would boost the economy by removing trade barriers between the country’s 29 states.

However, since launch, the system has been beset by problems from a confusing tax structure with four main rates to technical glitches that make it unstable.

The people familiar with the matter said they had warned government officials in the run up to the launch that a key part of the GST technology, allowing users to connect to the GST network, was not working smoothly. There were other technical flaws that resulted in incorrect tax assessments, they said.

One technology officer involved in the GST rollout said his company had to deal with a “revolving door” of government requests in the run up to the launch.

The director of the financial planning firm said the government was “adamant” on introducing GST on 1 July.

The disruption wrought by GST has been blamed in part for a slide in Indian economic growth to a three-year low in the April-June quarter. Growth rebounded in the following quarter.

The opposition Congress party is using the chaotic rollout of GST as a political stick to beat Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in elections in Gujarat, Modi’s home state. They are set to be a test of Modi’s political fortunes ahead of national elections due by 2019.

In one of the latest changes, the GST council, a political body that decides GST tax rates, cut the tax rate on a popular Gujarati snack to 5% from 12%, which Praveen Rai, a political analyst at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, said was driven by BJP “fear of an electoral backlash in state elections.”

A person working for an audit firm said in one example, a test adopted by GSTN did not reflect real-world conditions.

“GSTN in the month of April and May gave 100 companies an invoice to upload and see whether it was getting uploaded or not,” he said.

“You can’t really test the system by taking one invoice as a sample,” he said. “GSTN told companies it would do more testing with a larger number of transactions. That never happened.”

However, Prakash Kumar, the head of GSTN, said “a phased approach was adopted” at launch and “change is a constant in large IT projects.”

A top finance ministry official, who declined to be identified because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said Infosys failed to understand “the gravity of the situation” in building the network.

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.” Reuters

“No doubt, the government didn’t realise the difficulties that would be faced,” he said. “But Infosys is also responsible.”

GST Council Meeting held today brings the big updates. Tax rate cuts on 178 Items and restaurant bills from Nov 15 are some of the highlights. Watch full video to understand all updates.

Watch this video if you\’re looking for…
GST council Meeting
GST Meeting
GST
GST Updates
GST News
GST Arun Jai

This video will explain the modifications in the basic structure of GST. In 2017 GST saw a complete revamp. Here we will discuss the final provisions which are in existence at this point of time.
Watch this video for
change in GST
GST updates
GSt latest
GST revamp
GST in and out

For sponsorship

At midnight PM Narendra Modi will unveil the new tax regime replacing overnight the messy mix of more than a dozen state and central levies built up over seven decades, with a one national GST unifying the country\’s USD 2 trillion economy and 1.3 billion people into a common market.

About Channel:

GST will be expected to be reality in INDIA this july, so i tried to explain some basic concepts of GST, you all must know, this video contains basic concepts of GST in Hindi 🙂
As we all know that earlier that the long awaited GST will be rolled out in India from 1st April 2017 onwards. But due to

GST rittrn ckr , GST ke rittrn kaa SYSTEM kaise kaam krtaa hai
Check-out my latest videos by clicking links below :

HOW TO FILE TRANS 1, HOW TO FILE TRAN 1

GST : GSTR 3B RETURN AND PAYMENT DATE EXTENDED, GST PAYMENT DATE EXTENDED :

Ravish kumar prime time 6 oct 17
GST Rates changed. Government reduced GST Rates in 26-27 items and Government also introduce new rules for GST. (Part 2/3)

The Goods and Services Tax (GST), the biggest reform in India’s indirect tax structure since the economy began to be opened up 25 years ago, at last looks set to become reality. The Constitution (122nd) Amendment Bill comes up in Rajya Sabha today, on the back of a broad political consensus and boos

GST is suppose to be implemented in India on 1st July 2017. There is an explanation with a very simple way.

Goods And Services Tax (GST) Bill is Approved from both the houses & It is going to Roll out across INDIA From 1st July 2017.
How GST can be used to make One Nation, One Tax is explained in this video in HINDI.
The GST is a Value added Tax (VAT) is proposed to be a comprehensive indirect tax levy on

Goods And Services Tax (GST) Bill is Approved from both the houses & It is going to Roll out across INDIA From 1st July 2017.
How GST can be used to make One Nation, One Tax is explained in this video in HINDI.
The GST is a Value added Tax (VAT) is proposed to be a comprehensive indirect tax levy on

GST News compiled on 28.11.2017 by TaxHeal

TaxHeal Mobile App Download :

Subscribe Taxheal by Email :

Daily GST News Taxheal :

GST News 08.12.2017 by TaxHeal

TaxHeal Mobile App Download :

Subscribe Taxheal by Email :

Daily GST News Taxheal :

GST News Compiled on 30.11.2017 by TaxHeal

TaxHeal Mobile App Download :

Subscribe Taxheal by Email :

Daily GST News Taxheal :

To BUY DVDs of CA / CMA / CS contact us :
@ 011-45695551 : Delhi
@ 0551-6050551 : Gorakhpur
@ SMS : 09889004575
@ mail id : dilipbadlani1@gmail.com
@ www : www.badlaniclasses.online

GST RETURN 3B FILING for July and August | File your GSTR 3B before 20 Aug &20 Sep Online Live Demo
Form GSTR-3B needs to be filed by a taxable person under GST for submitting the provisional assessment of the tax liability. Provisional assessment of the taxes to be filed under form GSTR-3B is only

GST RETURN 3B FILING for July and August | File your GSTR 3B before 20 Aug &20 Sep Online Live Demo
Form GSTR-3B needs to be filed by a taxable person under GST for submitting the provisional assessment of the tax liability. Provisional assessment of the taxes to be filed under form GSTR-3B is only

vstu evN sevaa kr|What is Gst in Hindi | Gst Council | Gst Full Form |gst slabs | Most Important MCQs on GST for competitive Exams | What is GST ( Goods and Services Tax ) ? , GST In Hindi with MCQ , what is gst in hindi |

Download Pdf :

GST Quiz :

Cu

This is Video for updating the Major Changes introduce in GST by Last Meeting of GST Council.

Watch this video for…
Major Shifting in GST
GST Council updates
Turnaround in GST
Removal of reverse charge in GST
No RCM in GST
Postponement of 9(4) in GST
GST updates
Latest in GST
Service provider

To Buy DVDs / Pen Drive contact at :
@ Delhi : 011-45695551
@ Gorakhpur : +91-7052208065
@ Mobile : +91-9889004575
@ mail id : dilipbadlani1@gmail.com
@ website : www.badlaniclasses.online
@ Delhi @ Gorakhpur @ Indore @ Pune @ Mumbai

This video will explain the procedure of GST refund. Now GST refund can be applied manual as well as online. SO if your refund is also due apply for it.
Watch this video for
GST refund
GST refund process
GST RFD 1A
GST refund form
GST ka refund

For sponsorship and collaboration, please visit…
ht

The Supreme Court in October banned the use of petroleum coke, better known as petcoke, in and around New Delhi in a bid to clean up the air in one of the world’s most polluted cities.

Cumulatively, the services exports during the April- October period of the 2017-18 fiscal reached USD 94.48 billion. The imports stood at USD 55.44 billion.

At least 20 public sector banks (PSB) in India now have their gross non-performing assets (GNPAs) above 10 percent of their total advances, six of them above 15 percent and one bank has reported GNPA at 22.42 percent (Indian Overseas Bank). According to Capitaline data, total gross NPAs reported by 42 banks aggregated to Rs 7.32 lakh crore as of December end, as compared with Rs 4.51 lakh crore in the year-ago period and Rs 7.05 lakh crore in the September quarter. Of this chunk, close to 88 percent is in the books of state-run banks.

The bad loan story of state-run banks continues and there are hardly any signs of things improving in the near future. The demonetisation-impact on the business of companies, especially small and medium ones will start reflecting fully in the fourth quarter offering even more worrying numbers unless some miracle happens and the economic recovery picks up sharply easing cash flows of corporations and households.

The weak health of PSU banks, which controls 70 percent of assets of India’s banking industry and owned by the government (government holds over 70 percent stake in 15 of these banks), signals the problem in making for the government and Indian economy on the whole. More bad loans in these banks means more capital needed to fill up their demand for mandatory provision requirements and less funds to spend on lending to productive sectors.

In turn, it means heavy burden on the government, which will have to fork out money to fill up the void in these banks. This is because no private investor, domestic or foreign, would be too keen to put their money on the table betting on these lenders.

Rating agencies have, time and again, warned about this issue. But the governments have largely ignored all major warnings. It either believes that state-run banking system would either take care of its own or the taxpayer will continue to bail out these entities. Government continues to undermine the gravity of the problem and shy away from bold banking reforms to address the NPA issue. Except for the merger of SBI bank group, there is no solid roadmap for consolidation for other banks yet. The ‘Indradhanush’ programme introduced by the Modi-government hasn’t touched the core issues beyond cosmetic changes.

Even the last budget was a disappointment as far as banking sector reforms are concerned. As said in an earlier column , some of the state-run banks are almost zombie banks, neck-deep in bad loans, and survive only with the aid of their owner–the government. These banks have proved their inefficiency time and again, also due to the policies of current and previous government using these entities as vehicles to roll out their populist agenda. There is no rationale why the government should continue to own these banks.

Even the last budget was a disappointment as far as banking sector reforms are concerned. As said in an earlier

, some of the state-run banks are almost zombie banks, neck-deep in bad loans, and survive only with the aid of their owner–the government. These banks have proved their inefficiency time and again, also due to the policies of current and previous government using these entities as vehicles to roll out their populist agenda. There is no rationale why the government should continue to own these banks.

It should have prepared a roadmap to exit the control in these banks and let private capital come in. But even that cannot happen until the process of NPA clean-up gets over. It is a time taking process.

If one looks at the credit growth trend in last few years, bank lending has almost dried up to industries, primarily on account of lack of economic activities on the ground. This is the reason despite getting huge deposits in the aftermath of demonetisation, banks have resorted to park money in government bonds rather than lending to industries.

But industrial demand can be revived only if stalled projects get fresh capital to get back on track. As of now, only top corporations with high credit ratings are able to tap the bond market while smaller ones are left at the mercy of other private investors and banks.

With private investment cycle yet to take off, bank money is the only source for majority of small and medium sized firms. This is why recapitalising banks become critical, so that these lenders can start lending to good companies with promising business proposals. The current recapitalisation plan (part of which the government promised to infuse Rs 10,000 this year) is too little to take care of PSB’s needs. The onus of repairing weak lenders with necessary capital lies only with the government. It can’t any longer ignore warning signals emerging from the sector that is the backbone of the economy.

Published Date: Feb 20, 2017 04:56 pm
| Updated Date: Feb 20, 2017 06:40 pm

Thank you for your support all these years. We’ve relaunched BTInvest as BTWealth in an effort to focus on wealth and investment-related stories. Unfortunately, this means that we will no longer offer a free portfolio tool, nor will we offer interactive stocks data. For that, we recommend SHARE INVESTOR .com , which offers a sophisticated portfolio tool and in-depth data as part of its paid subscription service. You can also download a PDF of our daily print-edition market data pages, which include forex rates.

Thank you for your support all these years. We’ve relaunched BTInvest as BTWealth in an effort to focus on wealth and investment-related stories. Unfortunately, this means that we will no longer offer a free portfolio tool, nor will we offer interactive stocks data. For that, we recommend

, which offers a sophisticated portfolio tool and in-depth data as part of its paid subscription service. You can also

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – “Livin’ on a Prayer” rockers Bon Jovi, British bands Dire Straits and the Moody Blues, the late Nina Simone and The Cars will be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, organizers said on Wednesday.

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – “Livin’ on a Prayer” rockers Bon Jovi, British bands Dire Straits and the Moody Blues, the late Nina Simone and The Cars will be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, organizers said on Wednesday.

The rock-heavy 2018 list marks a return to the roots of the U.S. Hall of Fame, which for the past two years has broadened its base to welcome rap artists like the late Tupac Shakur and N.W.A.

Bon Jovi, led by Jon Bon Jovi, formed in 1983 in New Jersey and remains one of the biggest acts in the U.S. music industry, releasing albums every couple of years. The band toured the United States in 2017 in support of its “This House is Not for Sale” album.

Dire Straits, led by guitarist Mark Knopfler, burst to fame in 1979 with the single “Sultans of Swing” and enjoyed a succession of hits in the 1980s including “Money for Nothing” and “Brothers in Arms.” The band broke up in 1995 when Knopfler embarked on a solo career.

Jon Bon Jovi performs at The Songwriters Hall of Fame 48th Induction and Awards Gala at the New York Marriott Marquis Hotel in Manhattan, New York, U.S., June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly/Files

Progressive 1960s rockers Moody Blues are best known for hits like classical rock fusion “Nights in White Satin” and “Go Now.” After several changes of lineup, the band is due to embark in January on a U.S. tour to mark the 50th anniversary of its “Days of Future Passed” album.

The Cars, formed in Boston in the late 1970s, merged rock and synthesizer-oriented pop to produce hits like “Drive” and “Just What I Needed” before breaking up in 1988. The band reunited in 2010, releasing the album “Move Like This,” and toured in the United States in 2011.

Singer-songwriter and civil rights activist Nina Simone died in 2003 at age 70 after finding fame in the 1960s with songs like “To Be Young, Gifted and Black” and “Mississippi Goddam.” Modern artists ranging from Elton John to Kanye West have credited her with influencing their work.

The inductees were voted on by music fans and 900 music industry experts and will be inducted at a ceremony and performance show in Cleveland, Ohio, on April 14.

Artists who were nominated this year but not chosen for induction included British singer Kate Bush, alt-rock band Radiohead and the J.Geils band.

Anda akan menghabiskan sebagian besar waktu Anda di timeline ini, di mana pembaruan aktual tentang hal-hal yang berarti untuk Anda akan ditampilkan.

Ketika Anda melihat Tweet yang Anda suka, sentuh tombol hati — orang yang menulisnya akan diberi tahu bahwa Anda telah menyebarkan cinta.

Retweet adalah cara tercepat untuk menyebarkan Tweet orang lain ke pengikut Anda. Sentuh ikonnya untuk langsung mengirim.

Utarakan pendapat Anda tentang Tweet apa pun dengan Balasan. Temukan topik yang Anda minati, dan bergabunglah.

Universal Credit is failing, and truth be told, I probably don’t need to convince you of that fact. There is a technical term in Whitehall for a project as far-gone as Iain Duncan Smith’s welfare grand reform plans: “A steaming pile of garbage”.

IDS’s pet project (before he moved onto fixing Britain’s relationship with the EU) was supposed to make work pay and simplify the benefits system. It does neither: cuts and caveats piled on the project by George Osborne to save money mean people in work will get less than under the current system. Claimants see their payments jump around like a flea from month to month. Conditionality, the root of complexity and bureaucracy in the benefits system, has if anything been ramped up. The system not only fails on its own terms, but has been associated with soaring rent arrears and foodbank use amongst people subjected to it.

With Iain Duncan Smith now safely on the backbenches, you could be forgiven for wondering why a project without any redeeming features hasn’t been scrapped. There is an obvious political reason for this: it would be a huge climbdown and admission of failure on a flagship project that was first announced in 2010 and has only got worse after over seven years. But governments can take those, ride out a week of bad publicity, and then go back to talking about Brexit for the rest of our lives. But in UC’s case, there is a far more concrete reason the project hasn’t been cancelled.

To understand why, from the Government’s point of view, UC really, really, can’t be cancelled, cast your mind back to the heady days of November 2015. George Osborne had just U-turned on his plans to cut tax credits after a massive outcry. Except, he hadn’t quite cancelled the cuts – eagle-eyed hacks noticed that Universal Credit would still be cut by the same amount and in the same way when it replaced the existing tax credit system. Since everyone would eventually move to UC, the tax credit cuts were really just delayed. It was a political sleight of hand, but it was also ages away, so it didn’t get that much attention.

It also turns out that those delayed tax credit cuts were also the only really big money savers the Government has been able to cut from the welfare budget. Despite tabloid moaning, the benefits spend is already pretty lean and when you start to take big chunks off it, extremely bad things happen, people get very upset, or both. The early vigour with which the coalition government announced new cut after new cut has tailed off in recent years in the face of political opposition.

So the only big welfare cuts the Conservatives managed to make are hard-baked into Universal Credit. Add to this a host of other smaller cuts that come in with UC, like work allowances, higher sanction rates, extra conditionality for parents with young children, and the project becomes a tray on which to bring in a whole host of cuts and keep the Government from straying even further from its deficit targets. If the Government scraps the scheme, it either has to re-announce those extremely unpopular tax credit cuts, or completely miss its deficit targets, formally admit that austerity has been a huge failure, and lose its last shred of fiscal credibility.

Better for them to kick the can down the road, though not so great for the people who have to live with it.

STAR WARS 8 The Last Jedi star John Boyega revealed he personally “apologised’ to Prince Harry and Prince William after their cameo was cut from the film.

The Star Wars 8 actor said he personally apologised to the Princes during the film’s premiere in London.

“But I apologised. I did personally apologise to them. I said ‘sorry you were cut out of the film.'”

The London-born actor – who plays stormtrooper-turned-hero Finn – said Prince William took the news amicably, saying he might have to improve his “acting skills.”

Speaking to This Morning, Mr Boyega said: “Will was kinda just like ‘I probably need to work more on my skills.’ And I said ‘maybe but you’re alright.’

Disney and Lucasfilm have built the hype and expectations for The Last Jedi to unprecedented heights during the two years since The Force Awakens hit cinemas.

But while the critics have given it almost universally positive reviews, many fans who flocked to the first screenings are venting their fury with the treatment of the most iconic character in the entire franchise, saying he “deserved better.”

Even Luke Skywalker himself has made constant references to his uneasiness with Luke’s role in the new trilogy.

Actor Mark Hamill revealed that when he first read the script he was very unhappy with Luke’s fate. He then conceded that he had been won over by Rian Johnson’s vision.

However, this week he added that he regretted that much of George Lucas’ original vision for Episode 8 had been ruined.