The kids are alright: ‘Youthquake’ is Oxford word of 2017

Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake is yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the UK calls it out as a word on the move. Photo: AP

London: Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation on Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation on Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood.

Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake is “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage.

Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.”

See Also : www.newser.com

LONDON (AP) — Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood.

Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake has “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage.

Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.”

See Also : www.971talk.com

LONDON (AP) — Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood. Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake has “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage.

Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.”

See Also : www.republicworld.com

Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake

Youthquake is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake. Oxford lexicographers say there was a fivefold increase in use of the term between 2016 and 2017.

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand. Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood. Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake has “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage. Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.” 2016’s word of the year was “post-truth.”

See Also : www.timesunion.com

FILE – In this March 14, 2007 file photo, a man reads a copy of the Oxford Dictionary of English. Oxford Dictionaries is recognizing the power of the millennial generation with its 2017 word of the year: youthquake. Oxford lexicographers say there was a fivefold increase in use of the term between 2016 and 2017. It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.” (Ian Nicholson/PA via AP, File)

FILE – In this March 14, 2007 file photo, a man reads a copy of the Oxford Dictionary of English. Oxford Dictionaries is recognizing the power of the millennial generation with its 2017 word of the year:

LONDON (AP) — Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood.

Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake has “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage.

Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.”

See Also : www.seattlepi.com

FILE – In this March 14, 2007 file photo, a man reads a copy of the Oxford Dictionary of English. Oxford Dictionaries is recognizing the power of the millennial generation with its 2017 word of the year: youthquake. Oxford lexicographers say there was a fivefold increase in use of the term between 2016 and 2017. It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.” (Ian Nicholson/PA via AP, File)

FILE – In this March 14, 2007 file photo, a man reads a copy of the Oxford Dictionary of English. Oxford Dictionaries is recognizing the power of the millennial generation with its 2017 word of the year:

LONDON (AP) — Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood.

Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake has “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage.

Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.”

FILE – In this March 14, 2007 file photo, a man reads a copy of the Oxford Dictionary of English. Oxford Dictionaries is recognizing the power of the millennial generation with its 2017 word of the year: youthquake. Oxford lexicographers say there was a fivefold increase in use of the term between 2016 and 2017. It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.” (Ian Nicholson/PA via AP, File) (Associated Press)

LONDON — Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood.

Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake has “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage.

Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.”

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

LONDON (AP) a Oxford Dictionaries is recognizing the power of the
millennial generation with its 2017 word of the year: youthquake.

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social
change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana
Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging
youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of
30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl says the word has
“yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the
U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood.

Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake has “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage.

Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.”

LONDON (AP) — Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

LONDON (AP) — Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood. Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake has “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage.

Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.”

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

LONDON (AP) — Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017 word of the year : youthquake.

LONDON (AP) — Oxford Dictionaries recognized the power of the millennial generation Friday with its 2017

It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”

The word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for Britain’s Labour Party and the election of 30-something leaders in France and New Zealand.

Each year, Oxford University Press tracks how the English language is changing and chooses a word that reflects the annual mood.

Oxford Dictionaries president Casper Grathwohl said youthquake has “yet to land firmly on American soil, but strong evidence in the U.K. calls it out as a word on the move.”

Runners-up included broflake — a man who is readily upset or offended by progressive attitudes that conflict with his views– and kompromat, a Russian term for compromising information collected for political leverage.

Oxford Dictionaries consultant Susie Dent said many of the year’s standout words “speak to fractured times of mistrust and frustration.”

“In ‘youthquake’ we find some hope in the power to change things, and had a little bit of linguistic fun along the way,” she said. “It feels like the right note on which to end a difficult and divisive year.”

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

the kids are alright: ‘youthquake’ is oxford word of 2017 News Article With The full text news and with Resource Link at the bottom of the text and you can View this News Article in the source page.

london – oxford dictionaries is recognizing the power of the millennial generation with its 2017 word of the year: youthquake.oxford lexicographers say there was a fivefold increase in use of the term between 2016 and 2017.it is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.”the word, coined almost 50 years ago by then-vogue editor diana vreeland, has been used to describe phenomena including surging youth support for britain’s labour party and the election of 30-something leaders in france and new zealand.oxford dictionaries president casper grathwohl says the word has “yet to land firmly on american soil, but strong evidence in the u.k. calls it out as a word on the move.”runners-up announced friday included…

Two separate automobile tragedies Thursday in the Twin Counties left two people dead and another in the hospital.

Just before 3 a.m., a single car wreck on N.C. 111 claimed the lives of the driver and a child. Antoine Kenneth Coleman, 38, and Harmony Harrell, 4, were both killed about seven miles outside the Tarboro town limits, according the N.C. Highway Patrol. The relationship between the victims was not known at presstime, but the two did not share the same address.

The Highway Patrol was at the scene until after 7 a.m. gathering information. The accident is still under investigation, but careless driving and alcohol were listed as contributing factors in the report, according to an N.C. Highway Patrol representative.

In a separate incident that occurred about 9 a.m. Thursday, a man was struck by a commercial vehicle on U.S. 64 near the intersection with U.S. 64 Alternate, police said.

The man, who was not identified, was taken to the hospital with what Rocky Mount police Cpl. Mike Lewis described as injuries that were not life-threatening.

Lewis would not confirm reports that the accident involved a tractor-trailer or that the man deliberately stepped in front of the vehicle, saying only that the investigation was ongoing.

The Rocky Mount Police Department and other local agencies are working with the N.C. State Highway Patrol to enforce the Governor’s Highway Safety Program’s annual Holiday Booze It & Lose It campaign. Now through Jan. 1 law enforcement will be out in force to remove impaired drivers from roadways.

The Rocky Mount Police Department and other local agencies are working with the N.C. State Highway Patrol to enforce the Governor’s Highway Safety Program’s annual Holiday Booze It & Lose It campaign. Now through Jan. 1 law enforcement will be out in force to remove impaired drivers from roadways.

“We want to keep our roads safe and help people understand that the only time they should be behind the wheel is when they are sober,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the highway safety program. “Alcohol affects people differently, and you do not have to be feeling or acting drunk to be too impaired to drive. One drink is too many to get behind the wheel.”

In 2016, more than 1,400 people were killed in crashes on North Carolina roadways, including 354 alcohol-related deaths. This year so far, there have been 292 deaths resulting from a crash involving an impaired driver.

During last year’s Holiday Booze It & Lose It campaign, which ran from Dec. 9, 2016, through Jan. 1, 2017, there were 893 impaired driving-related crashes and 23 alcohol-related fatalities.

During last year’s Holiday Booze It & Lose It campaign, which ran from Dec. 9, 2016, through Jan. 1, 2017, there were 893 impaired driving-related crashes and 23 alcohol-related fatalities.

If holiday celebrations include alcohol, make plans in advance to have someone who is sober drive, Ezzell said. The alternative could change lives, not to mention the lives of passengers, or of nearby drivers, passengers and pedestrians, Ezzell said.

Since motorists never know who might be driving while impaired, they should slow down and practice caution, especially during holidays, said Rocky Mount police Cpl. Mike Lewis.

“Drive slow, wear your seat belt and make sure everyone in the car is buckled up,” Lewis said. “Anyone with questions or concerns about proper child safety restraints can stop by any fire station for help.”

The Highway Patrol offers the following tips to motorists to stay safe on the road this holiday season:

If someone has been drinking, don’t let that person get behind the wheel. Take their keys and help them arrange a safe way home.

Plan a safe ride home before the party starts. Designate a sober driver, call a taxi, use public transportation or use a rideshare app, like the BeSmarterThanThat.com mobile site, which allows users to call a taxi or friend and identify their location so they can be picked up.

“Remember, it is never safe to drink and drive,” Ezzell said. “Plan ahead. You’re smarter than that.”