Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro

Studio-friendly headphones are usually pretty expensive. For $99, the Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro are a refreshingly affordable circumaural (over-the-ear) pair for musicians, podcasters, filmmakers, and anyone else who wants to monitor with accuracy. A lightweight frame makes them useful on the go, and a detachable cable adds to the value. On top of this, the headphones deliver accurate bass depth and solid clarity in the highs. So for the first time in a while, we can add a new Editors’ Choice to the budget-friendly studio headphones realm.

are usually pretty expensive. For $99, the Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro are a refreshingly affordable circumaural (over-the-ear) pair for musicians, podcasters, filmmakers, and anyone else who wants to monitor with accuracy. A lightweight frame makes them useful on the go, and a detachable cable adds to the value. On top of this, the headphones deliver accurate bass depth and solid clarity in the highs. So for the first time in a while, we can add a new Editors’ Choice to the budget-friendly studio headphones realm.

Pro audio headphones often skip stylish embellishments in favor of comfort and performance, but Beyerdynamic manages a spare, cool look with the matte black DT 240 Pro. The circumaural earcups, which are plastic without looking cheap, house dynamic drivers and do a solid job of tamping down ambient noise as well as leaking very little audio, making them ideal for tracking. Their outer panels are emblazoned with the DT 240 Pro name, while the Beyerdynamic logo appears on the plastic ends to the headband.

The earpads and headband are generously padded and covered in faux leather. They feel great and will continue to do so over long listening periods–a must for studio-oriented headphones. The included audio cable can be connected to either earpiece, and the earcups themselves can easily flip away from the ear as they often do on DJ headphones.

The headphones ship with one removable cable — a heavy-duty, half-coiled wire with no inline remote. We don’t view this as a negative, since if you’re recording with the DT 240 Pro, an inline remote will be of little use, and the price is low enough that we don’t expect a second cable option. The included cable is ideal for studio and recording applications–its partially coiled 49-inch design can extend up to roughly 10 feet. It terminates in a 3.5mm connection and ships with a quarter-inch adapter. The only other included accessory is a black drawstring protective bag.

a heavy-duty, half-coiled wire with no inline remote. We don’t view this as a negative, since if you’re recording with the DT 240 Pro, an inline remote will be of little use, and the price is low enough that we don’t expect a second cable option.

The included cable is ideal for studio and recording applications–its partially coiled 49-inch design can extend up to roughly 10 feet. It terminates in a 3.5mm connection and ships with a quarter-inch adapter. The only other included accessory is a black drawstring protective bag.

We tested the DT 240 Pro using an Apogee Symphony I/O as our sound source, as well as an iPhone 6s. With both sound sources, the headphones deliver a solid audio experience. On tracks with intense sub-bass content, like The Knife’s “Silent Shout,” you get plenty of thumping bass response, but it’s nothing compared with headphones that deliberately boost bass dramatically. The bass response here is accurate–this track happens to pump out the sub-bass quite a bit, and the headphone’s drivers reflect that, but it never sounds over the top, nor does the balance with the highs fall apart. Also, at top, unwise listening levels, the drivers don’t distort, which isn’t always the case with $100 headphones on this challenging track.

Bill Callahan’s “Drover,” a track with far less deep bass presence in the mix, gives us a better sense of the DT 240 Pro’s overall sound signature. The drums on this track sound full and round, but not boosted beyond their natural levels. Callahan’s baritone vocals get an ideal blend of low-mid richness and high-mid treble edge, and the guitar strums and higher register percussive hits also benefit from a strong high-mid and high frequency presence in the DT 240 Pro’s delivery. This is a balanced, accurate sound signature–it can reproduce deep lows when they’re in the mix, but it doesn’t invent them.

On Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild,” the kick drum loop receives the ideal amount of high-mid presence to accentuate its attack, punching through the various layers of the mix. The sub-bass synth hits are delivered with laudable presence. On heavily bass-boosted pairs, these synth hits can often sound overly thunderous and do battle with the vocals. Through the DT 240 Pro, the vocal performances are delivered with excellent high frequency clarity and never sound threatened by the powerful low frequency content. Perhaps there’s a smidge of added sibilance in there, but it’s not enough to make things sound weirdly sculpted or overly bright. Again, this is a pretty accurate frequency response, especially for headphones in this price range.

Orchestral tracks, like the opening scene in John Adams’ The Gospel According to the Other Mary , sound excellent through the DT 240 Pro. There’s perhaps the slightest bit of low frequency boosting, bringing out the lower register instrumentation ever so slightly. But it’s the higher register brass, strings, and vocals that own the spotlight, and they’re delivered with clarity and detail.

, sound excellent through the DT 240 Pro. There’s perhaps the slightest bit of low frequency boosting, bringing out the lower register instrumentation ever so slightly. But it’s the higher register brass, strings, and vocals that own the spotlight, and they’re delivered with clarity and detail.

For quite a long while, our favorite affordable studio-friendly over-ear headphones have been the Sennheiser HD 280 Pro . They remain an excellent option, but lack the detachable cable provided by the Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro. We’re also fans of the Sennheiser HD6 Mix , and consumer headphones that might as well be studio pairs, like the Beyerdynamic DT 880 Pro and Sony MDR-1A , but the prices on these models vary quite a bit. For a sub-$100 pro audio option, the DT 240 Pro deliver accurate, clear audio with solid bass depth in a comfortable design, earning our Editors’ Choice award for budget-friendly professional headphones.

. They remain an excellent option, but lack the detachable cable provided by the Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro.

, but the prices on these models vary quite a bit. For a sub-$100 pro audio option, the DT 240 Pro deliver accurate, clear audio with solid bass depth in a comfortable design, earning our Editors’ Choice award for budget-friendly professional headphones.

See Also : The Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro gives … – Digital Trends

From video-game streaming to podcasting and producing video content for YouTube , it seems like everyone is making some kind of audio or video-filled project these days. In fact, content creators make up such a large volume of headphone consumers that audio company Beyerdynamic has a purpose-made pair of headphones, the Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro, just for them.

, it seems like everyone is making some kind of audio or video-filled project these days. In fact, content creators make up such a large volume of headphone consumers that audio company Beyerdynamic has a purpose-made pair of headphones, the Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro, just for them.

The new headphones are what the company calls “compact over-ears,” meaning that though they appear to have earpads of a similar size to most on-ear headphones, they actually do provide a seal around the edge of the ear for better passive noise isolation. As with most headphones designed to be used in professional production environments, the exterior of the Beyerdynamic DT 240 pro is simple and black, with each element of the design aimed more at long-term durability than on-street flash.

Speaking of durability, the compact on-ears feature replaceable earpads and a replaceable cable, which are two of the most common failure points for headphones that see extended use out in the wild. That, plus the swiveling earcups help them squeeze easily into camera bags and backpacks on the go, and should keep them from taking too much unwanted abuse when traveling from place to place.

The headphones will retail for a surprisingly affordable $117, putting them easily within reach of those used to operating on shoestring do-it-yourself budgets. In terms of audio quality, the company claims the sound signature and audio profile rely heavily on Beyerdynamic’s higher-end models , putting great audio quality on creators’ ears for a very low price.

The headphones will retail for a surprisingly affordable $117, putting them easily within reach of those used to operating on shoestring do-it-yourself budgets. In terms of audio quality, the company claims the sound signature and audio profile rely heavily on

“The DT 240 PRO addresses the wants of our customer base in a cost-effective manner without sacrificing quality,” said Beyerdynamic’s Director of the Americas Alan Feckanin in a press release. “We feel this will be a great extension of our headphone line and will excel in the market.”

As more and more people pick up microphones and cameras to create their own content, the new headphones may prove to be a perfect option. The Beyerdynamic DT 240 pro are currently available for sale on the company’s website . We look forward to putting them through their paces as soon as we can get our hands on a pair.

As more and more people pick up microphones and cameras to create their own content, the new headphones may prove to be a perfect option. The Beyerdynamic DT 240 pro are currently available for sale on

See Also : beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO open Studio Headphone – amazon.com

This was, most certainly, not an impulse buy on my part but rather the result of a very long search for a good all-around open-back headphone, light and comfortable, with near reference sound quality (yet not overly analytical) and a reasonable price. Was that too much to ask for? Apparently not, since that search led me here: to the Beyerdynamic DT990-Pro-250. Now, for those who are curious (as I was) about that extra “AMS” label as seen here on this Amazon listing: the AMS stands for “American Music and Sound” – this is the US pro-audio distributor of Beyerdynamic. So the AMS is just an unnecessary marketing label – there is just one type of DT990-Pro, which is this one, regardless whether you buy it in North-America, Europe, Asia, etc. That aside, let me start off with the build quality: The DT990-Pro is made entirely of ABS plastic, save for the headband and the forks holding the cans, which are made of metal (aluminum, I’d say, from the weight of it). The head-band is covered with a soft black plastic material held in place by four small clasp-buttons. The DT990-Pro is surprisingly light and extremely comfortable (in this it rivals the other “most-comfortable” headphones I have here, the Sennheiser HD-598). Overall I’d rate the build quality as top-notch, save for the somewhat under-designed cable strain relief (located on the left can). The cable is about 3m log, it is coiled and it ends with a 1/8in jack. A screw-on 1/4in jack is also provided. The strain-relief of the cable at the can attachment point seems (to me) a little too small because the coiled cable is very heavy and with use (given sufficient time) I can see it failing and leading to cable/connectivity issues. Also (this is just a minor personal quibble) the silver velour pads may seem dirty depending on how the light hits them (but again, no big deal, especially since black-velour or leather pads for it are available on Amazon or elsewhere). On to sound quality: Computer/audio gear used during my listening tests: MacBook-Pro w/ Mac OS X 10.6.8 XMOS USB 2.0 Audio Reference Design Asynchronous DAC (44.1-192kHz/24bit), HiFiMeDIY Sabre USB DAC (32-96kHz/24bit), Matrix M-Stage Headphone Amp, FiiO E12-Mont Blanc Headphone Amp Beyerdynamic DT990-Pro Open Headphones (250 ohm, 96dB/mW) Audio-Technica ATH-A900 closed-back headphones (40 ohm, 101dB/mW), Superlux HD-681 semi-open headphones (32 ohm, 98dB/mW), and Sennheiser HD-598 open headphones (50 ohm, 100dB/mW). Playback software: Audacity, iTunes, VLC Source quality: standard CD 44.1kHz/16bit, and native HD 88.2-96kHz/24bit Audio cables: 3.5mm to RCA (3ft), and RCA-to-RCA (3ft), AUVIO and Monoprice brands The Sound (overall conclusion both DACs/HP-Amps): Good dynamics, detail and clarity, well staged and with good imaging. In terms of frequency response these headphones are tuned such as to emphasize/boost the low and high ends. Perhaps the best way to summarize the DT990-Pro sound by comparison with the other three headphones I have here would be this: The DT990-Pro nearly matches the Superlux HD681 in bass impact without sacrificing dynamics, it easily matches the Sennheiser HD598 in mid-range sparkle, staging, and imaging, and gives the Audio-Technica ATH-A900 a good run for the money in terms of highs extension. The closest of my other headphones in terms of overall SQ would be the Sennheiser HD598. However, despite the slightly more neutral presentation of the Sennheiser’s, I find the DT990-Pro sound far more preferable. The DT990-Pro has a much better low end, and has smoother, more extended highs without that slight veil characteristic to Sennheiser headphones (clearly the Sennheiser HD-598 are decent cans but somehow I could never get too excited about their sound, hence my search for a different pair of open-back headphones). Also, the DT990-Pro manages to present the high end with what I’d call more “precision” than the ATH-A900 without sounding as grainy, and with just as much aplomb as the Superlux without sounding as (excessively) bright. Note: The DT990-Pro are both high impedance (250ohm) and relatively less efficient than the other cans I mentioned here (they only manage 96dB/mW) and thus amping is a must for anyone wishing to get the most out of them. For instance, my iPod Shuffle 1-st Gen (max output: 0.57Vrms) cannot drive them to any reasonable listening level (without severe clipping) and only manages a lifeless, distorted, garbled presentation, while the MacBook-Pro sound card (1.4Vrms) drives them to sufficiently loud levels but with pretty obvious distortions (for an overall harsh, fatiguing presentation.) Based on my experience with such sources I would not recommend these cans for use with portable devices without a proper amp. Also to note: the DT990-Pro do require at least 8-10hr of initial break-in to start sounding right (before that the sound is overly bassy, and somewhat unfocused/cloudy). As of this writing I have 30-35hrs on it and for sound quality I’d break things out like this: Bass Extension: 6/10 Bass Impact: 7/10 Bass Texture: 7/10 (solid) Mids Quality: 7.5/10 Highs Extension: 8.5/10 Highs Quality: 8/10 (vivid) Highs Texture: 7.5/10 (soft) Detail/Transparency: 8/10 (clear) Dynamics: 8.5/10 (natural) Soundstage: 8/10 Imaging: 7/10 Other: Isolation: 2/10 (open design) Comfort: 9/10 Design/Aesthetics: 9/10 (classic Beyerdynamic design) Build quality: 9/10 Portability: 5/10 (fairly large size) Improvement w/ Amplification: 8.5/10 (Note: Amping is recommended!) Value at MSRP: (9/10) [I gave it a 9/10 here only because, by comparison, the $30 Superlux HD681 is still a better bang for the buck!] To conclude, the Beyerdynamic DT990-Pro are near reference headphones which sacrifice some neutrality for the sake of a more natural sounding, or rather, a more fleshed-out acoustic presentation. As far as I’m concerned, it suffices to say that the DT990-Pro is the only headphone I have here that I can listen to (with any kind of music) without EQ and not feel that I might be missing something (and that, I think, says a lot). All in all, a remarkable offering from Beyerdynamic, highly recommended!

This was, most certainly, not an impulse buy on my part but rather the result of a very long search for a good all-around open-back headphone, light and comfortable, with near reference sound quality (yet not overly analytical) and a reasonable price. Was that too much to ask for? Apparently not, since that search led me here: to the Beyerdynamic DT990-Pro-250. Now, for those who are curious (as I was) about that extra “AMS” label as seen here on this Amazon listing: the AMS stands for “American Music and Sound” – this is the US pro-audio distributor of Beyerdynamic. So the AMS is just an unnecessary marketing label – there is just one type of DT990-Pro, which is this one, regardless whether you buy it in North-America, Europe, Asia, etc.

That aside, let me start off with the build quality: The DT990-Pro is made entirely of ABS plastic, save for the headband and the forks holding the cans, which are made of metal (aluminum, I’d say, from the weight of it). The head-band is covered with a soft black plastic material held in place by four small clasp-buttons. The DT990-Pro is surprisingly light and extremely comfortable (in this it rivals the other “most-comfortable” headphones I have here, the Sennheiser HD-598). Overall I’d rate the build quality as top-notch, save for the somewhat under-designed cable strain relief (located on the left can). The cable is about 3m log, it is coiled and it ends with a 1/8in jack. A screw-on 1/4in jack is also provided. The strain-relief of the cable at the can attachment point seems (to me) a little too small because the coiled cable is very heavy and with use (given sufficient time) I can see it failing and leading to cable/connectivity issues. Also (this is just a minor personal quibble) the silver velour pads may seem dirty depending on how the light hits them (but again, no big deal, especially since black-velour or leather pads for it are available on Amazon or elsewhere).

The Sound (overall conclusion both DACs/HP-Amps): Good dynamics, detail and clarity, well staged and with good imaging. In terms of frequency response these headphones are tuned such as to emphasize/boost the low and high ends. Perhaps the best way to summarize the DT990-Pro sound by comparison with the other three headphones I have here would be this: The DT990-Pro nearly matches the Superlux HD681 in bass impact without sacrificing dynamics, it easily matches the Sennheiser HD598 in mid-range sparkle, staging, and imaging, and gives the Audio-Technica ATH-A900 a good run for the money in terms of highs extension.

The closest of my other headphones in terms of overall SQ would be the Sennheiser HD598. However, despite the slightly more neutral presentation of the Sennheiser’s, I find the DT990-Pro sound far more preferable. The DT990-Pro has a much better low end, and has smoother, more extended highs without that slight veil characteristic to Sennheiser headphones (clearly the Sennheiser HD-598 are decent cans but somehow I could never get too excited about their sound, hence my search for a different pair of open-back headphones). Also, the DT990-Pro manages to present the high end with what I’d call more “precision” than the ATH-A900 without sounding as grainy, and with just as much aplomb as the Superlux without sounding as (excessively) bright. Note: The DT990-Pro are both high impedance (250ohm) and relatively less efficient than the other cans I mentioned here (they only manage 96dB/mW) and thus amping is a must for anyone wishing to get the most out of them. For instance, my iPod Shuffle 1-st Gen (max output: 0.57Vrms) cannot drive them to any reasonable listening level (without severe clipping) and only manages a lifeless, distorted, garbled presentation, while the MacBook-Pro sound card (1.4Vrms) drives them to sufficiently loud levels but with pretty obvious distortions (for an overall harsh, fatiguing presentation.) Based on my experience with such sources I would not recommend these cans for use with portable devices without a proper amp. Also to note: the DT990-Pro do require at least 8-10hr of initial break-in to start sounding right (before that the sound is overly bassy, and somewhat unfocused/cloudy). As of this writing I have 30-35hrs on it and for sound quality I’d break things out like this:

Value at MSRP: (9/10) [I gave it a 9/10 here only because, by comparison, the $30 Superlux HD681 is still a better bang for the buck!]

To conclude, the Beyerdynamic DT990-Pro are near reference headphones which sacrifice some neutrality for the sake of a more natural sounding, or rather, a more fleshed-out acoustic presentation. As far as I’m concerned, it suffices to say that the DT990-Pro is the only headphone I have here that I can listen to (with any kind of music) without EQ and not feel that I might be missing something (and that, I think, says a lot). All in all, a remarkable offering from Beyerdynamic, highly recommended!