Samsung’s 49-inch Gaming Monitor First to Be HDR Certified

The only monitor you need on your desk (because it will take up your entire desk) is now VESA DisplayHDR 600 certified.

If you’re in the market for a new TV today, then “4K” and “HDR” are both things you want your TV to have, but what if instead your want a new monitor? 4K resolution is already the norm, but HDR? Not so much. However, Samsung’s huge CHG90 monitor not only supports HDR, it’s the first gaming monitor to receive VESA certification for it.

If you’re in the market for a new TV today, then “4K” and “HDR” are both things you want your TV to have, but what if instead your want a new monitor? 4K resolution is already the norm, but HDR? Not so much. However,

The CHG90 is the widest gaming monitor you can buy at 49-inches, offering a 32:9 aspect ratio and 3,840-by-1,080 resolution on its QLED panel. It also supports AMD’s FreeSync 2 and HDR as standard. But from today, Samsung can also claim the CHG90 is VESA certified using the DisplayHDR standard.

at 49-inches, offering a 32:9 aspect ratio and 3,840-by-1,080 resolution on its QLED panel. It also supports AMD’s FreeSync 2 and HDR as standard. But from today, Samsung

DisplayHDR specifies the quality of the HDR offered by a monitor rating it by luminance, color gamut, bit depth, and rise time. There are three levels : DisplayHDR 400, 600, and 1000, with the CHG90 achieving DisplayHDR 600 certification. Samsung conveys this as meaning HDR content can be “enjoyed in bright indoor lighting conditions.”

DisplayHDR specifies the quality of the HDR offered by a monitor rating it by luminance, color gamut, bit depth, and rise time. There are

: DisplayHDR 400, 600, and 1000, with the CHG90 achieving DisplayHDR 600 certification. Samsung conveys this as meaning HDR content can be “enjoyed in bright indoor lighting conditions.”

For anyone considering a new monitor purchase, this certification makes the Samsung CHG90 a tempting proposition. Not only will it handle any HDR-enabled games on your PC, but you can also hook up a PS4 Pro or Xbox One X and enjoy the HDR-enhanced visuals either console outputs.

For anyone considering a new monitor purchase, this certification makes the Samsung CHG90 a tempting proposition. Not only will it handle any HDR-enabled games on your PC, but you can also hook up a

When the CHG90 was originally released back in June, the price was set at $1,499. However, that’s no longer the case with Amazon listing it for just $999 right now. That’s not bad considering just how big this monitor is.

When the CHG90 was originally released back in June, the price was set at $1,499. However, that’s no longer the case with

See Also : Samsung’s mega-wide gaming monitor is first to be HDR …

The CHG90 has a very weird 3,840 x 1,080 resolution (a 32:9 aspect ratio),144 Hz refresh, AMD FreeSync support, deep curvature and a $1,300 price tag, so it’s not for everyone. It’s built mainly to replace multi-monitor setups so that you can, say, game on one half and stream on the other. As a single screen, it could give you more visibility and flexibility with controls, but does not, obviously, deliver full 4K resolution.

It’s interesting that a gaming monitor is first to receive the VESA DisplayHDR certification, as there are plenty of professional graphics monitors designed for maximum color accuracy and contrast. However, many of those use IPS panels that lack brightness and likely wouldn’t meet the 600/350 cd/m2 threshold. Samsung has mostly used its QLED tech for 4K TVs, and while the blacks aren’t as good as on OLED displays, they’re definitely bright.

On the color side, VESA says that monitors must display a billion colors (10 bits), but 8-bit panels with 2 bits of “dithering” to simulate 10 bits also qualify. Very few monitors have true 10-bit panels, but most of Samsung’s QLED TVs do (Samsung’s specs for the CHG90 don’t say ).

On the color side, VESA says that monitors must display a billion colors (10 bits), but 8-bit panels with 2 bits of “dithering” to simulate 10 bits also qualify. Very few monitors have true 10-bit panels, but most of Samsung’s QLED TVs do (Samsung’s specs for the CHG90

VESA promised to announce multiple DisplayHDR certified monitors on or before CES 2018, so you can expect to see others soon. It will be interesting to see which is the first to conform to DisplayHDR 1000, which is much more demanding for brightness and black levels (contrast). If consumers start pushing manufacturers to meet those specs, it will be a big plus for both gamers and streamers.