The Most Eye-Catching TVs at CES 2018

It’s still a race to have the biggest, baddest TV at CES. These are the most interesting ones we saw in Las Vegas.

CES is always a big time for TVs, and every major manufacturer showed up in Las Vegas to show off their new, huge, advanced models. There were plenty of familiar names at the show, and a few unexpected twists.

Samsung won the sheer size game with its 146-inch Wall, a TV capable of reaching such massive scale thanks to its use to MicroLED technology instead of LCD or OLED. Rather than liquid crystal or light-emitting diode panels, which become increasingly difficult and expensive to manufacture as they get larger, the Wall by Samsung uses an array of multicolored non-organic light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, to form its picture. Each pixel is basically a tiny light bulb that can turn different colors. The result is a gigantic screen.

Incremental changes show a lot of promise, as LG, Sony, and TCL demonstrate. Instead of new, wildly different designs and revolutionary features, these manufacturers are pushing forward with conventional upgrades to (relatively) conventional, well-established models. And there’s nothing wrong with that when those models are already very good.

Nvidia is jumping into the TV game in its own way with its Big Format Gaming Display. It looks like a 65-inch TV, but it’s really a 65-inch gaming monitor with G-Sync. That means it’s more responsive, has lower input lag, and features the Nvidia Shield platform built-in, to boot.

Yes, 8K was on display at CES. Samsung, Sony, and plenty of others showed off big screens with 7,680-by-4,320 resolution. They’re huge and look good, but you won’t have to worry about them replacing your 4K TV any time soon. They’re mostly proof-of-concept TVs, and few if any retail models have left China. More importantly, there’s no consumer content available in 8K yet, and major studios and publishers are still trying to get 4K into peoples’ hands. Think of these very high-resolution TVs as a preview of what we might get in five or 10 years.

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You need to make yourself seen at CES and, along with simply buying-up huge swathes of the showfloor, the easiest way for many big brands is with increasingly crazy TVs .

You need to make yourself seen at CES and, along with simply buying-up huge swathes of the showfloor, the easiest way for many big brands is with increasingly

And since television manufacturers last year featured the super-slim LG Signature W OLED, the Panasonic EZ1002 second-gen OLED, Sony’s first A1 OLED and the Samsung Q9 QLED, it’s no surprise that this year they’ve doubled down on how much your television can do.

LG announced five new OLED ranges – the W8, G8, E8, C8 and B8 – all of which come under the company’s ThinQ concept. This makes them smarter, able to connect to other smart devices and be controlled with Google Assistant.

LG announced five new OLED ranges – the W8, G8, E8, C8 and B8 – all of which come under the company’s

concept. This makes them smarter, able to connect to other smart devices and be controlled with Google Assistant.

They’re also packing all the latest visual technology, including HLG, HDR10 and Dolby Vision varieties of HDR – and, uniquely for a TV manufacturer, Technicolor’s Advanced HDR.

Sony’s innovations also centre around smart speakers – as its latest AF8 range can be controlled by Google Assistant or Alexa systems. It’s also putting out an update for its devices so they’ll support Dolby Vision; this is a long awaited update as Dolby’s software seems to bring out the best in your pictures… provided it’s implimented well.

Sony’s innovations also centre around smart speakers – as its latest AF8 range can be controlled by Google Assistant or Alexa systems. It’s also putting out an update for its devices so they’ll support Dolby Vision; this is a long awaited update as Dolby’s software seems to bring out the best in your pictures…

But its flagships have been left well alone (understandably, we feel, as they’ve been chart-toppers for a while). The AF8’s slot in underneath them, providing a bit more diversification in the OLED market.

Panasonic, however, did announce new OLED televisions, the Z950 and Z800, with the intention of bringing ‘Hollywood to your home’. They also include Panasonic’s latest picture-processing suite, HCX, and ‘Dynamic LUT’ for tweaking luminance levels. Unlike LG, which is looking to be the smartest, it seems like Panasonic is trying to bring out the best looking televisions about.

Samsung, meanwhile, are continuing a technological trend they began early last year with QLED sets. There’s no denying that we’ve been impressed with QLED in the past, but usually it’s lost out to OLED. Apart from that, and integration of Bixby, Samsung has been pretty secretive about what they’re bringing out this year. We’ll just have to wait and see what the future holds…

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Standing in front of six new LG 3mm-thin OLED TVs on a revolving platform at the recent Consumer Electronics Show, it’s hard not to think that we’ve reached the peak of what television designers can achieve. But perhaps even more eye-catching at the trade event in Las Vegas was the showcase of 8K TVs at the Samsung booth.

Although Samsung’s 65-inch and 98-inch 8K TVs were only concepts and not for sale, there were plenty of other brands prepared to demonstrate that 8K TVs are ready to go.

With four times more resolution than the 4K TVs now in stores, and a whopping 16 times more detailed than the Full HD TVs most of us have in our living rooms, there are already signs that the 8K TV will take off first in China and Japan.

Given that Chinese companies are now top tier manufacturers in the TV market, Hisense, Skyworth and Changhong showed off 65-inch and even 98-inch 8K TVs at the CES.

Many think that 8K is just over the top, that the 33 megapixel images they show are above and beyond what anyone wants or needs, but TV manufacturers beg to differ.

At the CES, 4K TVs – which are quickly becoming standard in stores – were conspicuous by their absence. They’re yesterday’s news.

According to analysis from IHS Market, sales of 4K TVs have been doing well in the past year, and they’re forecast to sell 78 million in 2017, up from 56 million in 2016. But more than that, the push for higher resolution TVs is making us buy larger television sets.

“We’ve almost competed the switchover to 4K in large screen sizes,” says Paul Gagnon,a research director at IHS Market, adding that the 50-inch+ TV market will be 100 per cent 4K in a few years.

So why not go even bigger? That’s exactly what Chinese TV makers are thinking. “4K has already become a fact of life in larger TVs, so everyone’s looking at the next thing,” says Gagnon, who thinks that we’ll see the first 8K TVs go on sale in 2018.

“China can make them now, no problem,” he says. The CES also saw Dell launch the first 8K resolution PC monitor, with its 32-inch UP3218K set to sell for US$4,999 (HK$38,780) when it launches in March.

If you think it’s too soon for the 8K era, it’s largely down to the business reality of surviving in the TV market.

“8K is happening relatively shortly after the introduction of 4K, so it might put people off upgrading to 4K,” says Gagnon, but the profit margin compresses so fast that hardware manufacturers need to look beyond 4K as soon as possible.

However, a lack of 8K content means this resolution revolution won’t be quick. Film directors are beginning to use a new 8K camera called the Red Weapon, but the main source of 8K content won’t come along until the Tokyo Olympics in 2020, which Japanese state broadcaster NHK plans to film and transmit domestically in 8K resolution.

It may seem like a big step too soon for many, but the jump from 4K to 8K is only about giving TVs the same pixel density as the phone you stare at every day.

However, for those after perfection there is one catch; OLED TVs don’t come with 8K resolution just yet, so if you want both ultra-slim and ultra-detailed, you’re going to have to take a long-term view.

But for most of us, ultra-slim TV screen is already a giant leap forward in home entertainment. For years we’ve all wanted flatter, better, higher resolution TVs, but by the time 2017 is over, there probably won’t be much tech left for TV designers to explore.

Near to LG’s so-called “wallpaper” TV exhibit at CES was a 10 metre-wide tunnel completely plastered in OLED TVs that together showed entrancing images of the universe in motion. Can LG make OLED tech go mainstream?

Short for organic light-emitting diode, OLED is essentially a new – and more expensive – way of creating light for a TV. The depth ofLG’s Signature W OLED TV (the “W” stands for wallpaper) is just 2.57mm thin.

It’s hard to tell in an exhibition centre, but the Signature W OLED TV seemed to have at least as impressive colours and deep blacks as LG’s other OLED TVs.

With that in mind LG also announced its far more affordable (and not quite as slim) OLED E7 and LG Signature OLED G7 TVs in January, but the future of OLED technology really depends not on what LG does, but on what other TV brands do.

OLED panels are manufactured only by LG, which desperately needs more customers if it’s to expand production in South Korea.

Sony has announced that it will also sell OLED TVs in 2017, with the panels sourced from LG. The Sony Bravia A1 Series OLED TVs will go on sale in spring in 55-inch, 65-inch and 77-inch screen sizes.

“Sony has a historic brand in television and does a lot of advertising, so there will be heightened interest in OLED,” says Jack Wetherill, senior market analyst at Futuresource Consulting, which says that one million OLED TVs were sold last year.

“Having an extra brand pushing it will be good, but Sony only has about five per cent of the global TV market, so in terms of global share it’s quite small.”