The digital world needs new lawmakers

The current, “sudden” plague of deepfake videos is just the latest in a series of “unexpected” events caused by “unplanned” use of technology. More will occur, and indeed are already happening: in a similar vein the computer-generated mash-up videos on YouTube that care more about eyeballs than child protection; the ongoing boom in cyber-trolling; bitcoin pimping and pumping. To be expected are misuse of augmented and virtual reality, 3D printing and robotics. Wait, 3D-printing of guns is so five years ago .

is just the latest in a series of “unexpected” events caused by “unplanned” use of technology. More will occur, and indeed are already happening: in a similar vein the computer-generated

on YouTube that care more about eyeballs than child protection; the ongoing boom in cyber-trolling; bitcoin pimping and pumping. To be expected are misuse of augmented and virtual reality, 3D printing and robotics. Wait, 3D-printing of guns is so

As I’ve written before , such bleak illustrations are the yang to innovation’s ying: trolling, for example, is the downside to the explosion of transparency illustrated by the ongoing, global wave of #MeToo revelations (“revelations” in its traditional, not salacious media sense). The present day is multi-dimensional and complex, and it is often difficult to separate positives from the negatives: so much so that we, and our legislative bodies, act like rabbits in headlights, doing little more than watch as the future unfolds before our eyes.

, such bleak illustrations are the yang to innovation’s ying: trolling, for example, is the downside to the explosion of transparency illustrated by the ongoing,

wave of #MeToo revelations (“revelations” in its traditional, not salacious media sense). The present day is multi-dimensional and complex, and it is often difficult to separate positives from the negatives: so much so that we, and our legislative bodies, act like rabbits in headlights, doing little more than watch as the future unfolds before our eyes.

Or, we try to address the challenges using ill-equipped mechanisms — was it Einstein who said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them”? Nice words, but this is what we are doing, wholesale and globally: lawmakers are taking fifteen years to create laws such as GDPR which, while good as they go, are also, immediately insufficient ; meanwhile the court of public opinion is both creating, and driven by, power-hungry vested interests; and service providers operate stable-door approaches to policy.

Or, we try to address the challenges using ill-equipped mechanisms — was it Einstein who said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them”? Nice words, but this is what we are doing, wholesale and globally: lawmakers are taking fifteen years to create laws such as GDPR which, while good as they go, are also, immediately

; meanwhile the court of public opinion is both creating, and driven by, power-hungry vested interests; and service providers operate stable-door approaches to policy.

What’s the answer? To quote another adage, “If you want to get there, don’t start from here.” We need to start our governance processes from the perspective of the future, rather than the past, assessing where society will be in five, ten, fifteen years’ time. In practice this means accepting that we will be living in a fully digitized, augmented world. The genie is out of the bottle, so we need to move focus from dealing with the potential consequences of magic, and towards accepting a world with genies needs protections.

In practical terms, this means applying the same principles of societal fair play, collective conscience and individual freedom to the virtual world, as the physical. I’m not a lawmaker but I keep coming back to the idea that our data should be considered as ourselves: so for example, granting access to a pornographic virtual or 3D-printed robot representation of an individual, against their will, should be considered to be abuse. It’s also why speed cameras can be exploitative , if retrofitted to roads as money generators.

In practical terms, this means applying the same principles of societal fair play, collective conscience and individual freedom to the virtual world, as the physical. I’m not a lawmaker but I keep coming back to the idea that our data should be considered as ourselves: so for example, granting access to a pornographic virtual or 3D-printed robot representation of an individual, against their will, should be considered to be abuse. It’s also why speed cameras can be

Right now, we are trying to contain the new wine of the digital age in very old, and highly permeable skins created over previous centuries. I remain optimistic: we shall no doubt look back on this era as a time of great change, with all its ups and downs. I also remain confident in the democratizing power of data, for all its current, quite messy state, and that we shall start seeing more tech-savvy approaches to legal and policy processes.

Meanwhile, perhaps we shall rely on younger, ‘digital native’ generations to deliver the new thinking required, or maybe — is this too big an ask? — those currently running our institutions and corporations will have the epiphanies required to start delivering on our legislative needs, societal or contractual. Yes, I remain optimistic and confident that we will get there; however, when this actually happens is anybody’s guess. We are not out of the woods yet.

See Also : SC colleges have millions in building needs. Will they get …

S.C. colleges and universities want less this year from the Legislature. But the answer could be the same: No.

Colleges and universities made it a priority a year ago to get a bond bill through the S.C. Legislature that would allow them to pay for their long-term maintenance needs for campus buildings.

However, that push failed when lawmakers balked at $1.1 billion in borrowing requests, and Gov. Henry McMaster threatened to veto the bond bill if it passed.

When lawmakers return to Columbia on Tuesday, the dollar amount the colleges are seeking this year has been winnowed down to $500 million and, with road repairs addressed in 2017, the competition for state money should be less.

When lawmakers return to Columbia on Tuesday, the dollar amount the colleges are seeking this year has been winnowed down to $500 million and,

State Sen. Shane Massey, R-Edgefield, the Republican majority leader in the Senate, worries the proposed mix of school projects and other infrastructure needs in the borrowing bill hasn’t been vetted by lawmakers to ensure it is the best use of taxpayer dollars.

“The big problem is the way it’s been handled,” Massey said. “This has not gone through the normal committee process. … If it did, the projects could be vetted, higher education leaders would have to justify each project, and we could decide if these are really the highest priorities.”

Colleges say the money is needed to prevent bigger repair bills in the future and hold down spiraling tuition costs, an issue for thousands of S.C. students and their parents.

State Rep. Gilda Cobb-Hunter, D-Orangeburg, supports a bond bill, but she doesn’t think it likely the Legislature will pass its first borrowing bill since 2001.

“The last time we passed a bond bill, I was the Democratic leader, and we passed it by one vote,” she said.

For the University of South Carolina, which requested nearly $178 million from the bond bill in 2017, passing the bill remains a top legislative priority. The school’s biggest request is for $50 million to start construction on a new medical school at the BullStreet development in Columbia.

For the University of South Carolina, which requested nearly $178 million from the bond bill in 2017, passing the bill remains a top legislative priority. The school’s biggest request is for $50 million to start construction on a

USC wants to create a new research and innovation hub, said spokesman Wes Hickman. A new medical school campus also would allow USC’s medical school to move from its current location at Columbia’s Dorn VA Medical Center, where its nominal $1-a-year lease is about to increase dramatically.

“Federal guidelines now call for market-based leasing,” Hickman said. “By 2030, it could cost us $8 million.”

Just like the state’s roads need constant maintenance and repair, South Carolina’s colleges and universities need regular upkeep, Hickman warns.

But Senate Majority Leader Massey doesn’t think the state’s biggest education needs are at its largest universities.

“If you walk around USC or Clemson, you see construction going on,” he said. “The smaller colleges probably have greater needs.”

At USC Aiken, for example, a more than 40-year-old heating and cooling system contributes to mold problems and high electric bills at the school’s Penland Administration Building. The school has asked for $3.5 million to fix the problem.

“It’s a prime example of a problem I’m sure every college has,” said Rep. Bill Taylor, R-Aiken. “This state budgets in a crazy way. … We should really set aside X amount every year for maintenance.”

Even if a bond bill doesn’t pass, Massey thinks colleges might get some help via money from the state’s capital reserve funds, or savings accounts, in the coming year.

But Cobb-Hunter worries lawmakers missed their chance to pass a borrowing bill last year. This year, many state representatives have the prospect of imminent re-election campaigns next fall weighing on their minds.

“I’m hopeful we can ensure passage, but I’m realistic,” she said. “It doesn’t take much to get cold feet in an election year.”

She added, “If we continue to kick the can down the road, it only adds to the cost. The time to act on this was now.”

See Also : R.I. lawmakers face tough decisions in new year – News …

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Rhode Island’s part-time legislators face a string of mega-sized budget deficits — and a tough yes-or-no decision on public dollars for a proposed new Pawtucket Red Sox stadium — from the moment they return to the State House on Tuesday to begin their 2018 election-year session.

They face a strong push from the outnumbered but politically potent progressives within their ranks to reshape the state’s tax, spending and social-policy agenda in a fashion that would hike the income tax rate for the state’s wealthiest taxpayers while raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour.

And depending on how the U.S. Supreme Court rules in a sports-betting case, they could end the session in heated debate over the reach of the state’s Lottery and casino contracts with IGT and Twin River, and the need for a voter referendum and competitive bids to enter the wide new world of state-run internet gambling. Stay tuned. By the end of June, this could be a big issue.

The House and Senate are scheduled to start at 4 p.m. on Tuesday with welcome-back speeches and the first rush of bill introductions.

Many will sound familiar: Runoff elections. Early voting. An abortion-rights guarantee. A proposed ban on firearms on school grounds.

In a nod to an issue dominating national news of late, the first weeks of the legislative year will also feature a series of sexual-harassment prevention training sessions for lawmakers and their staff, and the anticipated launch of a commission to study sexual harassment and assault in the Rhode Island workplace. House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello has promised to appoint as chairwoman Rep. Teresa Tanzi, the South County Democrat who alleged that a more senior lawmaker (whom she did not identify) once told her that sexual favors would produce more favorable treatment for her legislation.

But the PawSox will probably grab the spotlight on opening day when Senate leaders introduce a reworked version of last year’s bill to provide $44 million in city and state financing to build a mini-Fenway Park at the current site of an Apex department store in downtown Pawtucket. The ballpark would be a high-profile home for the privately owned Triple-A team, which now plays at 75-year-old McCoy Stadium.

The stadium-financing bill could wind its way to the full Senate for a vote within a week. What will happen next is uncertain.

One by one, Gov. Gina Raimondo, House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello and even Senate President Dominick Ruggerio — the retired administrator of an arm of the Laborers’ International Union — have distanced themselves in recent days from the fate of the stadium legislation.

Mattiello says the vast majority of people with whom he spoke while going door to door in his House district in Cranston this fall told him they “love the PawSox … but don’t give them any public money to stay.”

And Ruggerio said: “I would not say that the Pawtucket Red Sox was ever a priority of mine. It was a priority of the governor at one time.”

The stadium campaign spokesman, Guy Dufault, is confident the lawmakers will ultimately do what it takes to keep the PawSox in Rhode Island.

Why? “I think at the end of the day our legislators will see the value of the franchise to the fabric of Rhode Island, and they’ll see the economic value of keeping it here,” he said, rather than ceding to another suitor — such as Worcester — the estimated $2.3 million in annual tax revenues that he says Rhode Island receives from the team’s activities.

It’s a tough sell, however, in a year when the state is bleeding red ink in large part because of over-budget spending by social-service agencies, which could require cuts in the big public-assistance programs such as Medicaid, the health-insurance program for the poor.

If the projected deficits for this year ($60 million) and next year ($204 million) sound big, they are.

But take a deep breath: the year-ahead deficit projections are usually big at this point on the calendar. By now, the state’s official revenue-estimators have crunched the numbers and the budget office has done a sobering reality check on spending, but the governor has not yet finalized the new budget that she will propose for the fiscal year that begins each year on July 1.

At this point in fiscal year 2012, for example, the potential deficit was pegged at $294.6 million. In FY2016, it was $190.4 million. And then out popped a supposedly “balanced budget” at the end of each of those legislative years.

This current-year gap is the most immediate and pressing concern. The last time Rhode Island faced a bigger midyear deficit was in the throes of the Great Recession, in fiscal year 2010: $219.8 million.

This year’s shortfall has been exacerbated by a string of tax cuts that gave taxpayers some relief, but meant $82.1 million in forgone state revenue.

Exempting from the state income tax some retirement income — including Social Security benefits — for those within certain income limits cost the state $32.4 million in potential income.
Eliminating the sales tax on commercial energy bills cost $27.1 million.
Raising the Earned Income Tax Credit cost $17.9 million.
Reducing the corporate minimum tax cost $4.75 million.

On the Senate side, Ruggerio and Majority Leader Michael McCaffrey recently said “everything is on the table,” including Mattiello’s signature accomplishment, the six-year phaseout of the local car tax, with the state reimbursing the cities and towns in increasing amounts each year for their lost revenue.

Raimondo says the car-tax cut is safe for now, at least in her budget proposal, but she will need to make cuts where the big money is — Medicaid.

“You cannot close a $200-million [hole] without looking at Medicaid, right?” she said of the state and federally financed health insurance program for the poor. “It’s a billion dollars of spending. Every single state is struggling with it. I am so so proud of the fact that almost all Rhode islanders have … health care and health insurance. But we have to get smarter about how we pay for health-care services.”

She talks about the budget package she will deliver to lawmakers on Jan. 18 as if it were a set of not-ready-for-prime-time proposals whose backdrop is a cloud of uncertainty about the impact of the federal tax overhaul on state finances.

But her spokesman, David Ortiz, confirms she is also weighing potential pay hikes for child-care workers, including the private, home-based workers represented by the Service Employees International Union. More specifically, she is considering the inclusion in her budget proposal of “tiered reimbursement for quality childcare.” (Expect blowback from state employees with expired contracts, who have not had an across-the-board raise since October 2015.)

R.I. Working Families: For the union-backed coalition that scored a major victory this year with the passage of a paid sick-leave law, the 2018 priorities are a $15-an-hour minimum wage, equal pay, the adoption of an abortion-rights guarantee and the adoption of a higher income-tax rate for the state’s richest taxpayers.

Of the renewed drive to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 over five years, the group’s state director, Georgia Hollister Isman, told The Journal: “We’re going to ramp up a campaign around it and say loudly and clearly that we must [move] away from poverty wages and toward an economy that gives working people the minimum they need.”

On the equal-pay front, she said: “Even though federal law bans employers from paying different wages based on race and/or gender, gaps exist that we can address on the state level. Our bill — still in draft form — includes a ban on policies barring employees from discussing pay or punishing them if they do. It also will include a ban on asking potential employees about salary history.”

The group will also revive the push for a “millionaire’s tax.” The argument: “We’re facing a big budget gap while urgent needs like repairing our school buildings require investment now. The solution must include a fairer tax system, one that asks the wealthiest Rhode Islanders to pay more.”

The R.I. Center for Freedom and Prosperity: For this GOP-led local think-tank, repeal of the corporate minimum tax (“which is nothing more than a money grab”) is a high priority, along with a reduction in regulations and licensing requirements. The group vows, for example, to push again for repeal of the regulations imposed on hair braiders, and the repeal of a “$6 airport ride-share fee imposed bureaucratically last year.” Their goal: to “help make RI a more attractive place for the emerging shared and gig economy.”

Common Cause of Rhode Island: The top three priorities are “1) Redistricting reform (amending the state constitution to take the power away from the General Assembly) 2) In-person early voting … and 3) Magistrate selection (giving the power to the Judicial Nominating Commission and governor).”

Coalition Against Gun Violence: Having won a decades-long fight to prohibit gun possession by domestic abusers, the group will now renew its push for “No Guns in School” legislation that faced strenuous opposition from gun-rights advocates in 2017.

Another priority: Banning “the sale, transfer, manufacture and importation of military style weapons and high capacity magazines. Rhode Island should follow neighbors Massachusetts and Connecticut (and 8 other states) to ban weapons of war for civilian use. This will not stop every mass shooting, but it will… start to reduce the supply in our state,” says spokeswoman Linda Finn, who is a former state representative.

House Republicans: Under the leadership of Minority Leader — and GOP candidate for governor — Patricia Morgan, the tiny GOP caucus intends to repackage some earlier proposals under a new heading: “Retire in Rhode Island.” The notion: the legislature should remove obstacles to “growing, working and retiring” in the state, including some of the laws that drive up property taxes.

Morgan cites, for example, disability pensions. She suggests ending the special two-thirds pay, tax-free pensions for disabled police officers and firefighters when they reach retirement age, replacing them at that point with less-lucrative regular pensions. She also suggests repealing the prevailing-wage requirement for school repairs and construction to get more out of the $500 million in bonds that the governor and state treasurer are backing.

Anticipating Democrats’ response to the GOP proposals, she said: “They are not anti-union…. That’s how they see it. But it’s pro-taxpayer, pro-Rhode Islanders.”

The current, “sudden” plague of deepfake videos is just the latest in a series of “unexpected” events caused by “unplanned” use of technology. More will occur, and indeed are already happening: in a similar vein the computer-generated mash-up videos on YouTube that care more about eyeballs than child protection; the ongoing boom in cyber-trolling; bitcoin pimping and pumping. To be expected are misuse of augmented and virtual reality, 3D printing and robotics. Wait, 3D-printing of guns is so five years ago .

is just the latest in a series of “unexpected” events caused by “unplanned” use of technology. More will occur, and indeed are already happening: in a similar vein the computer-generated

on YouTube that care more about eyeballs than child protection; the ongoing boom in cyber-trolling; bitcoin pimping and pumping. To be expected are misuse of augmented and virtual reality, 3D printing and robotics. Wait, 3D-printing of guns is so

As I’ve written before , such bleak illustrations are the yang to innovation’s ying: trolling, for example, is the downside to the explosion of transparency illustrated by the ongoing, global wave of #MeToo revelations (“revelations” in its traditional, not salacious media sense). The present day is multi-dimensional and complex, and it is often difficult to separate positives from the negatives: so much so that we, and our legislative bodies, act like rabbits in headlights, doing little more than watch as the future unfolds before our eyes.

, such bleak illustrations are the yang to innovation’s ying: trolling, for example, is the downside to the explosion of transparency illustrated by the ongoing,

wave of #MeToo revelations (“revelations” in its traditional, not salacious media sense). The present day is multi-dimensional and complex, and it is often difficult to separate positives from the negatives: so much so that we, and our legislative bodies, act like rabbits in headlights, doing little more than watch as the future unfolds before our eyes.

Or, we try to address the challenges using ill-equipped mechanisms — was it Einstein who said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them”? Nice words, but this is what we are doing, wholesale and globally: lawmakers are taking fifteen years to create laws such as GDPR which, while good as they go, are also, immediately insufficient ; meanwhile the court of public opinion is both creating, and driven by, power-hungry vested interests; and service providers operate stable-door approaches to policy.

Or, we try to address the challenges using ill-equipped mechanisms — was it Einstein who said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them”? Nice words, but this is what we are doing, wholesale and globally: lawmakers are taking fifteen years to create laws such as GDPR which, while good as they go, are also, immediately

; meanwhile the court of public opinion is both creating, and driven by, power-hungry vested interests; and service providers operate stable-door approaches to policy.

What’s the answer? To quote another adage, “If you want to get there, don’t start from here.” We need to start our governance processes from the perspective of the future, rather than the past, assessing where society will be in five, ten, fifteen years’ time. In practice this means accepting that we will be living in a fully digitized, augmented world. The genie is out of the bottle, so we need to move focus from dealing with the potential consequences of magic, and towards accepting a world with genies needs protections.

In practical terms, this means applying the same principles of societal fair play, collective conscience and individual freedom to the virtual world, as the physical. I’m not a lawmaker but I keep coming back to the idea that our data should be considered as ourselves: so for example, granting access to a pornographic virtual or 3D-printed robot representation of an individual, against their will, should be considered to be abuse. It’s also why speed cameras can be exploitative , if retrofitted to roads as money generators.

In practical terms, this means applying the same principles of societal fair play, collective conscience and individual freedom to the virtual world, as the physical. I’m not a lawmaker but I keep coming back to the idea that our data should be considered as ourselves: so for example, granting access to a pornographic virtual or 3D-printed robot representation of an individual, against their will, should be considered to be abuse. It’s also why speed cameras can be

Right now, we are trying to contain the new wine of the digital age in very old, and highly permeable skins created over previous centuries. I remain optimistic: we shall no doubt look back on this era as a time of great change, with all its ups and downs. I also remain confident in the democratizing power of data, for all its current, quite messy state, and that we shall start seeing more tech-savvy approaches to legal and policy processes.

Meanwhile, perhaps we shall rely on younger, ‘digital native’ generations to deliver the new thinking required, or maybe — is this too big an ask? — those currently running our institutions and corporations will have the epiphanies required to start delivering on our legislative needs, societal or contractual. Yes, I remain optimistic and confident that we will get there; however, when this actually happens is anybody’s guess. We are not out of the woods yet.

January 25, 2013: Imagine a world where you can make anything you want, just by pressing \”print\”. 3D printers have arrived and they promise a fascinating future, depending on what we make. For more info, please go to

From beautiful and unbelievable instruments that actually work to even things like an incredible 3D printed pizza made by NASA!

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# 10 3D-Printed Ear
You’ve seen 3D printing make fashion garments and body prosthetics, so it’s not too much of a leap to ima

IT\’S RIIIICK! In this video I 3D printed Rick Sanchez and painted him using acrylic paint. He turned out really nice considering it was the first time I even attempted painting any of my 3D prints. But it was so much fun! I actually enjoyed it quite a bit, and with some more practice I\’m sure you ca

Hey YouTube! Which 3D printer should you buy? In today\’s video I did my best to cover everything you need to know about these 3D printers:

Anycubic I3 Mega:
Black Widow:
Snapmaker:
Anet E10:
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Metal 3d printing can be prohibitively expensive, but Iro3d is trying to change that with their new desktop metal 3d printer. Metal powders laid layer by layer in a crucible, then fired in a kiln, create a solid metal part!

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Cody R Wilson has figured out how to print a semi-automatic rifle from the comfort of his own home. Now he\’s putting all the information online so

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Watch this complex object get 3D printed in less than 15 minutes. Sean and Norm visit Carbon, the makers of the M1 3D printer, to get a demo of this new super fast 3D printing technology working in real-time. We chat with Carbon\’s VP of Product, Kirk Phelps, to learn how the CLIP 3D printing tech wo

Links to all the 3D Printers shown in the Video [ Show More ]

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Sindoh 3DWOX DP200 3D Printer

~*~ Best cheap 3d printer 2018 ~*~

FlashForge 3D Printers, New Model: Finder

For full tutorials check out my Patreon:
You can buy a figure or download the free files here:

The most requested character in the history of this channel! Tiny Rick! But I decided to go all out for this channel since i’ll soon hit 100k

Learning how to use FDM 3D Printers can be tricky enough without having these problems happen to you. In this video we discuss 5 of the biggest mistakes people make (and I have made many times) in 3D Printing, and how to avoid them.

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Note: The CORRECT UM

3D printing is changing the way we produce objects, from tools and toys, to food, and even body parts. It\’s a tech revolution taking place in homes across the world.

But how does it work exactly, and what makes it so efficient? Mashable explains the basics of 3D printing technology.

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While at CES 2018 I got to check out some of the 3D printing and scanning booths. Like my mic?

If you want to see more on CES, we are covering it all at Product Watch:
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Showing you 7 of my favorite 3D printed illusions of all time. These some fun illusions that have fascinated me and might trip out your mind too! I’ve included links to show you where you can download the 3D printed models for no charge if you want download them and try them on a printer.

Complet

Merriam-Webster defines a fabric as a cloth, or a material RESEMBLING cloth… that said, I think I can say that I have successfully printed some really cool fabrics in this video! After watching, print some for yourself at

Experiment, and share your results at

SLS 3D Printing is an amazing 3d printer technology that uses lasers to sintering a nylon powder to form awesome models! Here are some model from the Sinterit LISA.

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Jigsaw puzzles are fun and all, but they\’ve hardly changed in all of their 200+ year history. Well, now you can 3D print your own detailed 3D puzzles using terrain data from anywhere in the world!

Filament is MatterHackers PRO PLA
Blonde Yellow :

The MostFun Pro is a 3D printer with a lot of promise, but lack of attention to detail leaves it short of expectations.
MostFun Pro on Amazon :
Squircle Mug Download :

*this printer was sent to me for free in exchange for an unbiased review*

Have you ever wanted to know how you could turn your 3D printer into a revenue stream that makes you $100, $500, or even $1000 per month? In this short video I give you the tips and strategies that you can use to make it happen.

Meanwhile, I\’ll also be sharing with you my journey with all the ups a

Testing the limits of the 3D-printer, trying to make an ultra smooth Super Mario. For a long time I\’ve wanted to apply some of the things we have done when doing console modding to 3D-prints to see how nice figures it can make, and it turns out surprisingly good. Im really happy we did this, and I\’l